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Low-Code: Apply Your Technical Skills Even If You Don’t Know How To Code

Learn how non-coding testers can apply their technical skills to the QA process, from using no-code tools to understanding product and business requirements.

December 7, 2022
Tamas Cser

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Learn how non-coding testers can apply their technical skills to the QA process, from using no-code tools to understanding product and business requirements.
It’s a common misconception that not knowing how to code means being "non-technical".

Based on this, we believe that technical skills are a broad spectrum and encompass much more than just the ability to program code. This is particularly true for software testers, who need various skills beyond coding to do their job effectively.

Testing Requires a Variety of Technical Skills

Being a software tester requires much more than just coding skills. While developers primarily focus on how their product should work, testers must consider all related activities, permutations, and scenarios that might cause the product to fail. This requires a deep understanding of the product and underlying business processes, as well as analytical and problem-solving skills.

For example, testers must have a strong understanding of the product's intended design and functionality to identify potential issues and flaws. They must also be able to think critically and analytically to devise and implement effective test cases. Testers must also have a decent understanding of the business processes that the product supports to evaluate its functionality and usability properly.

Furthermore, testers must have a range of technical skills to use various testing tools and techniques effectively. This may include knowledge of API testing, database testing, and DevOps practices. These skills are crucial for ensuring a product is properly tested and meets the required quality standards.

Scripted Test Automation Tools Can Limit Testing Capabilities

Traditionally, scripted test automation tools have required testers to be programmers who can build and maintain test scripts. This approach can limit testing capabilities and exacerbate the skills gap between testers and developers. It can also slow down collaboration and hinder the testing process.

For example, the team's overall testing capabilities may be limited if only a small group of testers have the coding skills required to create and maintain test scripts. This can lead to slower testing cycles and a bottleneck in the development process. It can also result in a lack of collaboration and communication between testers and developers, as the testers may not have the necessary technical knowledge to discuss and troubleshoot issues with the developers effectively.

Low-Code Test Automation Tools Offer a Solution

Low-code or no-code test automation tools offer an alternative approach that allows anyone to automate testing, regardless of their coding abilities. These tools enable testers to use their existing skills and knowledge to design and implement effective test cases. This can increase team productivity, reduce costs, and improve overall product quality.

For example, with low-code testing, testers can use a graphical user interface (GUI) to create and execute test cases without needing to write any code. This allows them to focus on using their existing technical skills and knowledge to design and implement effective tests. It also enables teams to collaborate more easily, as testers and developers can use the same tool to design and execute tests, and discuss and troubleshoot issues together.

Low-Code Testing Helps Teams Overcome Skills and Labor Shortages

QA managers often face the challenge of building up their test automation capabilities when there is a shortage of skilled testers or labor. Low-code testing offers a solution by allowing anyone to contribute to the testing process, regardless of their coding abilities. This helps teams overcome shortages and ensure that testing is a collaborative effort.

For example, if a team has a shortage of skilled testers capable of writing and maintaining test scripts, low-code testing can help overcome this limitation. Using low-code test automation tools, the team can enable non-technical testers to contribute to the testing process and automate their tests without needing to write any code.

For example, suppose a team has a shortage of testers due to budget constraints or a lack of available talent. In that case, low-code testing can help to fill the gap by allowing other team members, such as business analysts or project managers, to contribute to the testing process. This can help to ensure that the team has sufficient testing coverage and can deliver high-quality products on time and within budget.

Grow With Functionize

In conclusion, being "non-technical" does not mean lacking the ability to code. Testing requires a variety of technical skills, including test design, analytical thinking, business process knowledge, and more. This is where a modern, innovative, and low-code test automation tool like Functionize can offer a solution for teams looking to automate testing without requiring specialized coding skills.

Functionize can facilitate the timely and efficient use of all the available skills of every team member, whether it’s analytical skills, test design skills, business process skills, database skills, API skills, DevOps skills, or any other.

With the help of Functionize, teams can increase productivity, reduce costs, and improve product quality with the existing team by treating every member as a crucial resource and utilizing their talent to the fullest extent.